By Thierry Moliere

 

The western Anatolian kingdom of Lydia waxed and waned from the early 7th century BC until its incorporation into the Achaemenid Persian Empire by Cyrus the Great in 546BC. At its height in the first half of the 6th century BC the Lydians ruled over most of western Anatolia including the Greek cities of Ionia—the eastern border between the Medes and Lydians lay upon the Halys river. Lydian armies were famous for their cavalry—feared even by Cyrus the Great—and also included chariots as well as Greek style hoplites.

 

 

 

Lydians
680-546 BC

 

 

 

 

 

 

The western Anatolian kingdom of Lydia waxed and waned from the early 7th century BC until its incorporation into the Achaemenid Persian Empire by Cyrus the Great in 546BC. At its height in the first half of the 6th century BC the Lydians ruled over most of western Anatolia including the Greek cities of Ionia—the eastern border between the Medes and Lydians lay upon the Halys river. Lydian armies were famous for their cavalry—feared even by Cyrus the Great—and also included chariots as well as Greek style hoplites.

USEFUL LINKS

Lydia on Wikipedia

Lydia on Livius.org